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Old glass net floats are a popular pillar ornament.
Cordyline - introduced to Europe from New Zealnd
Currach sitting on the barrier of stones diving Lough Bofin from the sea.
Shells on the beach at Knock.
In Inishbofin Harbour.
At the western end of the island - a memorial for two American students who drowned off the Stags of Inishbofin in 1976.
Carraig an Riaghailligh - Boulder at the western end of the island which is fully exposed to the Atlantic.
At the sheltered eastern end of the island is the 14th century ruins of St. Colman's church on the site of the monastery founded by the saint in 665. The island graveyard is still located here.
At the western end of the island which is fully exposed to the Atlantic.
At the western end of the island which is fully exposed to the Atlantic.
In Inishbofin harbour.
Loch on Teampaill is close to the ruins of St. Colman's church.
A well maintained Massey Ferguson in Middlequarter.
InishLyon seen from the beach at the Knock
InishLyon seen from the sheltered beach at Knock
The sheltered beach at Knock.



A donkey
Geese in Middlequarter.
A family of swans on Lough Bofin
Red Hot Poker (Kniphofia) in an island garden.
Unripe Blackberry by the side of the road.
Lichen on rocks near Ardlea Cove
A domestic hen.
New Zealand flax.
Montbretia or Crocosmia, a plant introduced to Ireland, via France, from South Africa.
Fuchsia Magellenica Riccartonii, a hybrid first grown, from South American parents, in Riccarton Scotland in about 1830. It grows from cuttings, rarely from seeds.
Heather
Tormentil



Cromwell's Fort' built by the Cromwellians in the mid 17th century.
The old pier in Inishbofin Harbour
One of the two ferries which operate from Cleggan.
Looking across Inishbofin Harbour towards the white navigation marker which marks the harbour entrance and to its left Cromwell's Fort.
A boat bearing a burden of beerless barrels bound for Cleggan.
Vehicle Ferry
The navigation marker at the entrance to Bofin Harbour. Note two more of the same among the houses in the background. Lining up these navigation markers is important for making a safe passage into the harbour.



Boats on the beach at the East End.


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